society

20th Century Georgian Advertising (29 Photos)

Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia has become a Transcaucasian hub in the 19th century. During this time a lot of social, political, economic and cultural changes took place. The oriental Tbilisi became a mix of the West and the East and the center of South Caucasus.

Capitalism was rapidly developing in the Russian Empire and so it was in Georgia (The country was annexed by the Russian Empire). New industrial enterprises appeared, a railway connecting Tbilisi and Poti was built. Banks were founded, workshops, department stores and exhibition halls were built. During this time new magazines, newspapers, science and art centers and societies came to life. Art exhibitions were held, the national theater was reborn. All of these establishments needed advertisement to reach out to public. So here they are – 29 examples of 20th Century Georgian Advertising. All of the images are taken from the book Old Tbilisi published in 1984 by “Sabchota Sakartvelo” Publishing House.

The Georgia Theater

The Georgia Theater

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World Press Freedom Day marked by a protest in Georgia [PHOTO/VIDEO]

World Press Freedom Day, May 3 was marked by a protest in Georgia’s capital Tbilisi. Journalists, bloggers and NGO representatives gathered on Rustaveli ave., where a staged funeral of Georgian media took place. Some of the protesters brought posters saying “we deserve free media”, “media is not your monkey”, etc. The protest was joined by a group of young Georgians who demand an investigation of a recent suspicious prison death. Here are some photos and a video of the funeral:

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Security Police to Install Cameras in Parks of Tbilisi

Security Police Department of Georgia (spd.ge) began installing cameras in recreational areas and parks of Tbilisi. According to the PR office of SPD, 100 cameras will be installed in 7 parks as a part of the ongoing project “Safe Parks”. The surveillance cameras have already been installed in one of the biggest recreational areas – Vake Park.

Courtesy of president.gov.ge

Most of the recreational areas of Tbilisi are monitored by Security Police personnel; SPD thinks that after installing the cameras their job will get easier.

According to the Security Police, live cameras will allow the department to monitor parks 24/7, minimize the risk of crime and increase response rate on possible incidents.

It has to be noted that under the “Freedom Charter”, that was passed by the Georgian Parliament in May, 2011, Ministry of Internal Affairs is set to create a major surveillance system that will monitor strategic buildings, airports, subway and railway stations, public spaces and etc. It also obliges banks to inform the Ministry about large bank transfers to organisations or individuals.

 

Summer in Georgia: Entertainment

Georgia – a tiny country in the Caucasus has been working a lot to position itself as one of the hot tourism destinations in the region and not only. Government has spent a lot and has attracted foreign business to develop infrastructure in its mountains, seaside and other regions. According to various sources the number of tourists increases every year and by 2015 it will reach 4-5 million (according to 2010 estimate Georgia’s population is 4.5 million). Truly, country has a lot to offer, The capital – Tbilisi is a mix of eastern and western cultures, here you may buy antiques and handmade carpets, enjoy the finest Georgian and Western cuisine, visit ancient churches and etc.

If you have not seen this ad, you might want to take a look in order to get a feeling of Georgia:

Batumi, the biggest seaside city is rapidly developing, brands like Sheraton and Radisson have already built hotels and more are coming.

Summer entertainment in Georgia is diverse.

On July 3rd, singer Sting and trumpeter Chris Botti held a concert in Batumi.

Sting and Chris Botti are not the only famous names that perform in Batumi this year. On July 24, annual Black Sea Jazz Festival will feature R&B and Soul singer – Macy Gray. Concert will be held on Batumi’s Piazza.

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Georgia: Government 2.0

Also posted on Global Voices.

Various agencies and officials in the Georgian government are increasingly embracing social media and Web 2.0 tools in order to communicate with the country’s computerized population. As the technology develops and more Georgians join social media sites, it becomes clear that the government intends to directly connect with its citizens. The leading reformer in the region, Georgia follows a world-wide trend of digitization and e-government by taking concrete steps online.

For example, citizens can download the driver’s license preparation test from the website of the Ministry of Internal Affairs, register and declare their property on the Revenue Service’s website and, in February this year, Transparency International Georgia, with the support of the Eurasia Partnership Foundation in Georgia, launched Chemikucha.ge, a local version of the British FixMyStreet.com, an online platform enabling citizens to report problems such as potholes or garbage collection.

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Georgia: Journalists dismissed because of Facebook hate speech

Also Posted on Global Voices

On 18 March 2011, the Georgian Public Broadcaster dismissed two of its journalists, Giorgi Tukhareli and Giorgi Gabrichidze, because of offensive comments they made on Facebook against homosexuals as well as the Vatican and the Catholic Church. The journalists wrote the remarks on the wall of a page, I don’t love my Patriarch, but even if the comments later disappeared, someone managed to take a screenshot to post on the Internet.

According to reports, Gabrichidze and Tukhareli resigned themselves, and Vakho Sanaia, the anchor of a program they worked on, personally met them. He said that it would be impossible for him to work with them again in the future. “Their comments are incompatible with our values and work style,” Vakho Sanaia told Media.ge. “The journalists quit themselves, and that’s what I wished.” Sanaia also said that he would not have worked with them from the beginning had he known that they were homophobes.

“I’m shocked. I could not believe until I saw it with my own eyes. Both Gabrichidze and Tukhareli were some of the best journalists and they have proven that many times by risking their lives to cover recent events in Egypt. Despite all this, program has its image, which has been jeopardized. We condemn this kind of action from journalists even if they write it on their Facebook wall,” Rusudan Vashakidze, the Producer of the program, told Onlinenews.ge.

According to Netgazeti.ge, Vashakidze talked to Gabrichidze over the phone and later denied claims that his profile had been hacked, while those responsible for the program they worked on said that Facebookis a public space and journalists had to understand that everything they wrote would negatively affect them. Gabrichidze and Tukhareli violated the Georgian Public Broadcaster’s code of ethics and therefore had to quit.

Meanwhile, with 516,300 Facebook users in the country, the largest penetration for the social networking site in the region, many agree with Vashakidze, saying that Facebook is indeed a public space and what Gabrichidze and Tukhareli did was wrong. Vakho Sanaia’s Reportage is a weekly overview of events and subjects in and outside of Georgia. Gabrichidze joined the program a year ago, and Tukhareli was hired in September.